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Danny Dorling

Danny Dorling is the Halford Mackinder Professor of Geography, Oxford. He appears regularly on TV and radio, and writes for the Guardian, New Statesman and other papers. He advises government and the office for national statistics. Among his books are All That Is Solid; Population 10 Billion; So You Think You Know About Britain?; and Injustice.

Blog

  • Labour: Verso's Essential Reading List

    Since storming to victory on September 14th 2015 with 59.5% of the vote in Labour's leadership election, Jeremy Corbyn has faced many challenges; including from within his own party.

    On Saturday he dealt with the most significant threat to his leadership to date. He increased his win to 61.8% in the leadership election, an unarguable mandate from his party members. 
    The results of this weekend will have an overwhelming effect on the landscape of British politics. But will the PLP now unify behind their leader?

    In the build up to the Labour Party Conference, the Leadership Election 2016, as well as the World Transformed festival (hosted by a coalition of grassroots groups and powered by Momentum), Verso has put together an essential reading list. Download our free eBook on
    Corbyn and the Future of Labour to get 40% off all of the books below until September 30th (click on the discount link within the ebook).


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  • Brexit: The Decision Of a Divided Country

    Blame austerity not immigration for the inequality underlying the referendum decision, argues Danny Dorling for the BMJ.

    "The outcome of the EU referendum has been unfairly blamed on the working class in the north of England, and even on obesity. However, because of differential turnout and the size of the denominator population, most people who voted Leave lived in the south of England. Furthermore, of all those who voted for Leave, 59% were in the middle classes (A, B, or C1). The proportion of Leave voters in the lowest two social classes (D and E) was just 24%. The Leave voters among the middle class were crucial to the final result because the middle class constituted two thirds of all those who voted."

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  • The 2015 UK election: A Reading List

    No one can really predict an election, but I don't think anyone expected a majority Conservative government. As we look to a future of more food banks, increased poverty and homelessness, as well as soaring inequality, we present a reading list featuring leading voices dealing with the key issues in British politics today.

    Steve Bell on David Cameron's employment statistics, Guardian

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