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Jeremy Harding

Jeremy Harding is a contributing editor at the London Review of Books. His books include The Uninvited: Refugees at the Rich Man’s Gate, Small Wars, Small Mercies, and Mother Country.

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  • World Refugee Day—A Migrant Solidarity Reading List

    Today is World Refugee Day, an international day dedicated to raising awareness about the 22.5 million people around the world who have fled their homes due to famine, violence, and persecution around the world.

    During Refugee Week, Threads: From the Refugee Crisis is 40% off until June 25 at midnight UTC. Click here to activate your discount. Verso will donate £1 from every purchase to Médecins Sans Frontières.

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  • Immigration Reading List: Against Racism, Against Borders—Refugees and Migrants Welcome!

    The delayed and despicable reactions of politicians from the foot-dragging David Cameron to the racist, "radical right" Hungarian PM Viktor Orbán to the current refugee crisis have resulted in a global upsurge of activism, with tens of thousands signed up to rally in central London and across Europe this Saturday as part of #EuropeSaysWelcome: European Day of Action for Refugees. The continent’s conscience has been moved as people all over the world upturn the racist, exclusionary narratives of politicians and the liberal and right-wing press with acts of compassion, generosity and everyday solidarity.

    We have put together a reading list intended to better our understanding of the underlying causes of the crisis, including: racism, political inertia and capitalist war.  

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  • Jungle Books: Calais migrant camp's newly opened library needs books!

    Update — Calais refugee library flooded with thousands of books: "Creator of Jungle Books urges people to donate money, not books, so refugees can cook – and read – in safety"—Guardian, 7th September 2015.

    Verso London is sending books to Jungle Books (or Livres de la jungle in French), the makeshift library at the Calais migrant camp known as the Jungle. Mary Jones, who set up the library, wants to add more books in the native languages of the migrants, refugees and asylum seekers, and hopes that eventually, the camp inhabitants will run the library. Besides stocking around 200 books, the Guardian reports, “the library supports a school that offers classes to the refugees and asylum seekers that live in the camp.”

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