'Shoplifters of the World Unite': Slavoj Žižek on the UK riots and the end of revolution

Missing

Slavoj Žižek writes for the London Review of Books on the UK riots: 

Repetition, according to Hegel, plays a crucial role in history: when something happens just once, it may be dismissed as an accident, something that might have been avoided if the situation had been handled differently; but when the same event repeats itself, it is a sign that a deeper historical process is unfolding. When Napoleon lost at Leipzig in 1813, it looked like bad luck; when he lost again at Waterloo, it was clear that his time was over. The same holds for the continuing financial crisis. In September 2008, it was presented by some as an anomaly that could be corrected through better regulations etc; now that signs of a repeated financial meltdown are gathering it is clear that we are dealing with a structural phenomenon.

We are told again and again that we are living through a debt crisis, and that we all have to share the burden and tighten our belts. All, that is, except the (very) rich. The idea of taxing them more is taboo: if we did, the argument runs, the rich would have no incentive to invest, fewer jobs would be created and we would all suffer. The only way to save ourselves from hard times is for the poor to get poorer and the rich to get richer. What should the poor do? What can they do?

...

Alain Badiou has argued that we live in a social space which is increasingly experienced as ‘worldless': in such a space, the only form protest can take is meaningless violence. Perhaps this is one of the main dangers of capitalism: although by virtue of being global it encompasses the whole world, it sustains a ‘worldless' ideological constellation in which people are deprived of their ways of locating meaning. The fundamental lesson of globalisation is that capitalism can accommodate itself to all civilisations, from Christian to Hindu or Buddhist, from West to East: there is no global ‘capitalist worldview', no ‘capitalist civilisation' proper. The global dimension of capitalism represents truth without meaning

...

The first conclusion to be drawn from the riots, therefore, is that both conservative and liberal reactions to the unrest are inadequate...It is meaningless to ponder which of these two reactions, conservative or liberal, is the worse: as Stalin would have put it, they are both worse.

Visit the London Review of Books to read the full article. 

Related Books

9781786630803
  • 0
  • 1
  • 2
Paperback
Paperback with free ebook
$24.95$12.4850% off
528 pages / July 2018 / 9781786630803
Ebook
Ebook
$9.99$5.0050% off
April 2011 / 9781844677955
Hardback
Hardback with free ebook
$29.95
432 pages / May 2010 / 9781844675982

Not in stock

Paperback
Paperback with free ebook
$22.95$16.0630% off
520 pages / April 2011 / 9781844677023