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October 26, 2017
The Maritime Origins of Abolition: The Case of Benjamin Lay, Quaker & Common Sailor
The Chancellor's Hall, Senate House, London
October 26, 2017
5.30pm - 7.30pm
The Chancellor's Hall, Senate House, London
The Chancellor's Hall, Senate House, London WC1 7HU
United Kingdom
Join Marcus Rediker to launch his new book The Fearless Benjamin Lay: The Quaker Dwarf Who Became the First Revolutionary Abolitionist 
How did a Quaker dwarf who worked as a commoner, a sailor, and a glove maker become one of the first British men to oppose slavery? 
 
Marcus Rediker takes us on a fascinating journey through the Early Modern Atlantic world alongside the radical Quaker sailor Benjamin Lay - a man who lived in a cave, made his own clothes, refused to consume any product of slavery, and conducted direct action against slave owners. Born in Copford, near Colchester, Essex, in 1682, Lay became one of the most intriguing figures of his era. His experiences as a sailor, and his time in Barbados and colonial Philadelphia fueled his passionate hatred of slavery and injustice.
 
Join author and historian Marcus Rediker as he uncovers the extraordinary story of Benjamin Lay and the maritime origins of abolitionism. This talk is part of the Royal Museums Greenwich's Maritime History & Culture Seminar Series.
 
Marcus Rediker is Distinguished Professor of Atlantic History at the University of Pittsburgh and author of The Many-Headed Hydra (2000, with Peter Linebaugh),  Villains of All Nations (2004), The Slave Ship (2007),  and most recently The Fearless Benjamin Lay: The Quaker Dwarf Who Became the First Revolutionary Abolitionist (2017).
The event is free and open to all. No RSVP needed. The talk will be followed by a wine reception.