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March 3, 2021
Katherine Angel in conversation with Matilda Bernstein Sycamore
McNally Jackson (Virtual)
March 3, 2021
7.00pm - 8.00pm
McNally Jackson (Virtual)
Join Katherine Angel & Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore for a conversation about TOMORROW SEX WILL BE GOOD AGAIN.

A provocative, elegantly written analysis of female desire, consent, and sexuality in the age of MeToo

Women are in a bind. They are told that in the name of sexual consent and feminist empowerment, they must proclaim their desires clearly and confidently. Sex researchers tell us that women don't know what they want. And men are on hand to persuade women that what they want is, in fact, exactly what men want. In this environment, how can women possibly know what they want—and how can they be expected to?

In this elegantly written, searching book Katherine Angel surveys medical and psychoanalytic understandings of female desire, from Freud to Kinsey to present-day science; MeToo-era debates over consent, assault, and feminism; and popular culture, TV, and film to challenge our assumptions about female desire. Why, she asks, do we expect desire to be easily understood? Why is there not space for the unsure, the tentative, the maybe, the let's just see? In contrast to the endless exhortation to know what we want, Angel proposes that sex can be a conversation, requiring insight, interaction, and mutual vulnerability—a shared collaboration into the unknown.

In this crucial moment of renewed attention to violence and power, Angel urges that we remake our thinking about sex, pleasure, and autonomy without any illusions of perfect self-knowledge. Only then will we bring about Michel Foucault’s sardonic promise, in 1976, that “tomorrow sex will be good again.”

Katherine Angel is a writer and a Lecturer in Creative Writing at Birkbeck, University of London, and the author of Unmastered: A Book On Desire, Most Difficult To Tell (2012) and Daddy Issues (2019). Her writing and research focus on sexuality, psychiatry, feminism, and gender in the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries. Katherine has a PhD in the history of psychiatry and sexuality from the University of Cambridge's History and Philosophy of Science Department.

Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore (mattildabernsteinsycamore.com) is the author of three novels and a memoir and the editor of five nonfiction anthologies. Her memoir, The End of San Francisco, won a Lambda Literary Award in 2014, and her previous book, Why Are Faggots So Afraid of Faggots? Flaming Challenges to Masculinity, Objectification, and the Desire to Conform, was an American Library Association Stonewall Honor Book. Her novel Sketchtasy, was one of NPR's Best Books of 2018. She lives in Seattle.