Authors

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    Michele Wallace

    Michele Wallace is currently Professor of English at CUNY’s Graduate Center and City College. She...
  • Judith-butler-max_141

    Judith Butler

    Recently interviewed for Guernica, on the power of nonviolent resistance.
  • Vronware-max_141

    Vron Ware

    Vron Ware is a Professor of Sociology and Gender Studies at Kingston University, UK. Her books...
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    Lynne Segal

    “A powerful manifesto for dealing with the march of time.” – Observer
  • Delphy-max_141

    Christine Delphy

    “France’s most exciting feminist writer.” —Simone de Beauvoir
  • Ghada_square-max_141

    Ghada Karmi

    An extraordinary memoir of exile and the impossibility of finding home, from the author of In Search of Fatima

Books

Events

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    July 15, 2015

    London, United Kingdom

    Roundhouse

    The Dialectics of Liberation

    A contemporary revisiting of the the now legendary 1967 Congress, with guest speakers including Selma James and Lynne Segal.
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    July 29, 2015

    London, United Kingdom

    Frontline Club

    The 51 Day War: Gaza One Year On

    A panel of journalists, including Max Blumenthal, reflect on Israel’s brutal assault on Gaza in July 2014 and what life has been like since.
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    July 23, 2015

    London, United Kingdom

    Rough Trade East

    Dead Children Playing: Stanley Donwood in conversation

    A launch event at Rough Trade East to celebrate the paperback release of Dead Children Playing, a book of Radiohead artwork.

Blog

  • Letter of support for Greece

    Signed by Etienne Balibar, Costas Douzinas, Barbara Spinelli, Rowan Williams, Immanuel Wallerstein, Slavoj Zizek, Michael Mansfield, Judith Butler, Chantal Mouffe, Homi Bhabha, Wendy Brown, Eric Fassin, and Tariq Ali

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  • Antonis Vradis and Hara Kouki: Our "no" means a "yes"

    In an exclusive article written for Verso, Antonis Vradis and Hara Kouki, members of the Occupied London collective, outline that, regardless of the outcome of Sunday's referendum in Greece, every "no" vote counted says "yes" to another kind of Europe. 


    Photo: NurPhoto/REX Shutterstock/NurPhoto/REX Shutterstock)

    It's a strange thing, hope. Five years ago, it made the sound of acronyms like the IMF, EU and EBC sound soothing to Greeks as the country’s first troika agreement was announced. Memorandum after memorandum, measure after measure, hope that things would get “better” was persistent. As we watched the elderly scrape through dustbins for food, as we saw scores of the younger ones taking off in one-way flights out of the country, as we were losing our right to labour, our capacity to take care of our parents and children, of our beloved ones, as we were losing our faith and trust in each other and in ourselves, in our agency to shape our lives. Soon enough, hope that things would come back to normal turned into hope they'd get somewhat better and then, that things wouldn’t get too bad. We often stood puzzled at this strange force that held us together and kept us going while we were losing everything, this religious-like belief in a system that had clearly stopped functioning some time ago.

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  • The Referendum as Rupture

    Greece must stand firm and vote "no" in Sunday's referendum to show that there is a real alternative to austerity, writes Panagiotis Sotiris, contributor to Springtime: The New Student Rebellionsin a piece first published on Jacobin


    A demonstrator at a Syriza rally encouraging Greeks to vote "no" (oxi) to the bailout conditions proposed by the European "institutions." Digby Fullam/Flickr

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  • Inside the European Cataclysm

    In a piece originally published by Solidarity, Enzo Traverso, author of the forthcoming Fire and Blood: The European Civil War, 1914-1945 (published by Verso in January 2016) reflects on the clash between politics, culture and violence in the years 1914-1945, an "epoch of blood and ashes".

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