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Paul Buhle

Paul Buhle,formerly a senior lecturer at Brown University, produces radical comics. He founded the SDS Journal Radical America and the archive Oral History of the American Left and, with Mari Jo Buhle, is coeditor of the Encyclopedia of the American Left. He lives in Madison.

Upcoming Events

  • Buhle_-_bohemians_300_cmyk

    April 28, 2014

    New York, NY

    CUNY Graduate Center

    Bohemians New York City Launch

    Join Bohemians author Paul Buhle in a panel discussion with contributing illustrators Sabrina Jones and Peter Kuper

Blog

  • New Left Review - new issue out now

    The May/June issue of New Left Review is out now, featuring the following essays:

    Susan Watkins: Another Turn of the Screw?

    Beneath the rolling surface of the Euro-crisis, a further chapter of the EU integration project is underway. Susan Watkins on the institutional machinery Berlin is imposing across the Union, and the political stakes – and hypocrisies – laid bare by the struggle.

    Michel Aglietta: The European Vortex

    Global economic turmoil has exposed the structural flaws in the single currency. Amid deepening divergences between industrial north and debt-laden south, Michel Aglietta assesses the Eurozone’s chances of recovery, and the impact of its continued travails on the world economy.
    Michel Aglietta is author of A Theory of Capitalist Regulation: The US Experience.

    Perry Anderson Ronald Fraser

    Tribute to the author of Blood of Spain, locating the impulse behind his oeuvre in a commitment to explore lived experience. Reconstructions of work, war, politics and subjectivity, from Napoleonic era to post-Fordist present.
    Amongst others, Perry Anderson is the author of The New Old World and Spectrum.

    Ronald Fraser: Politics as Daily Life

    How are collective mobilizations refracted through the prism of personal experience – and in what conditions can individual histories be constituted as history? Ronald Fraser reflects on memory, method and militancy.
    Ronald Fraser is author of In Hiding, In Search of a Past  and Napoleon's Cursed War: Popular Resistance in the Spanish Peninsular War, 1808-1814.

    Alèssi Dell’Umbria: The Sinking of Marseille

    The recent fate of France’s second city – post-war decline followed by modish resurgence – seen in the longe durée by its radical historian. A social and political archaeology  of Marseille, amid the steady dismantling of its urban worlds.

    Roberto Schwarz: Political Iridescence

    Brazil’s foremost literary critic engages with the autobiography of Caetano Veloso, its best-known musician. The dense wave of relations between 60s counter-culture and left movements, and its rending by years of dictatorship and capitalist triumph.
    Roberto Schwarz is the author of forthcoming Verso book, Two Girls

    The issue also features the following book reviews:

    Fredric Jameson on Francis Spufford, Red Plenty. A documentary-cum-fable reconstructs the lost future of the Khrushchev era.
    Visit NLR to read the review.
    Amongst others, Fredric Jameson is the author of Representing Capital: A Reading of Volume One.

    Tom Hazeldine on D. R. Thorpe, Supermac. Lengthy apologia for Harold Macmillan from a serial Tory biographer.
    Visit NLR to read the review.

    Gregory Elliot on Lucio Magri, The Tailor of Ulm. The trajectory of Italian communism, analysed by an unillusioned participant-observer.
    Visit NLR to read the review.

    Paul Buhle on Frank Bardacke, Trampling Out the Vintage. Chronicle of the United Farm Workers and their mercurial leader, Cesar Chavez.
    Visit NLR to read the review.
    Paul Buhle is author of It Started in Wisconsin: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the New Labor Protest.

    Visit the New Left Review to access the new issue or subscribe.

  • The working-class in the saddle: A reading list for May Day

    The 1st of May marks International Workers' Day, a festival of working-class self-organisation stretching back over 130 years. It was originally inaugurated to commemorate the "Haymarket Massacre" of 1886 in Chicago, where a bomb thrown during a worker's strike kicked off a police crackdown followed by a period of anti-labor hysteria.

    In 1890, the first internationally co-ordinated demonstration for an 8-hour day was held, in commemoration of those killed in the massacre, and those eight anarchists executed on trumped-up charges after the event.

    Here, Verso staff present "A Reading List for May Day", looking at the radical history of the festival in the European and North American labor movements, and how that spirit lives on in grassroots workplace struggles.

    Continue Reading

  • Paul Buhle on the air

    Paul Buhle did a number of radio interviews for the launch of It Started in Wisconsin, including Lake Effect on WUWM public radio in Milwaukee, Media Matters with Bob McChesney on WILL at University of Illinois, 8 O'Clock Buzz with Stan Woodard on WORT public radio in Madison, Uprising Radio on KPFK public radio in Los Angeles, and Sly in the Morning on WTDY talk radio in Madison. Stay tuned for more interviews.

Books