Richard Gott

Richard Gott is a former Latin America correspondent and features editor for the Guardian. A specialist in Latin American affairs, his books include Cuba: A New History, Guerrilla Movements in Latin America, The Appeasers (with Martin Gilbert), Land Without Evil, Hugo Chávez and the Bolivarian Revolution, and Britain's Empire. He is currently an honorary research fellow at the institute for the study of the Americas at the University of London.


  • Race and Ethnicity Undergraduate Reading List: 50% off!

    All the books on this list are 50% off until Tuesday 8th September as part of our Back to University/Back to School sale. See all the books included in the sale here.

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  • Tariq Ali on the launch of TeleSUR English, the largest Latin American news channel

    Last week, Venezuela-based news channel TeleSUR launched its English language website, bringing the left-leaning perspectives of Latin America to new audiences and offering a corrective to the English news media.

    The site, which largely represents the views of state backers Argentina, Bolivia, Cuba, Nicaragua, Uruguay and Venezuela, has already published incisive reporting on Israeli offensive in Gaza. Tariq Ali, Verso author and New Left Review editor, has long been involved with TeleSUR and will host The World Today, an interview show to be broadcast four times a week.

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  • Your country needs you!: Responses to the World War I Centenary

    National commemorations of major historical events usually offer an incredible opportunity for the Right to showcase its jingoistic logorrhea about national identity and patriotism. Starting this coming August, the First World War centenary will most likely be no exception.

    The Conservatives are battling on two different, though not unrelated, fronts. Contrary to what Max Hastings argues, it is the Right indeed who is “making an ideological argument out of World War I, as it does out of almost everything else in history.”

    In a Telegraph article, David Cameron puts particular emphasis on commemorating, and even celebrating the break-out of World War I as a moment of national unity and cohesion, “a fundamental part of our national consciousness.”

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