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Jeremy Harding

Jeremy Harding is a contributing editor at the London Review of Books. His books include The Uninvited: Refugees at the Rich Man’s Gate, Small Wars, Small Mercies, and Mother Country.

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  • Jungle Books: Calais migrant camp's newly opened library needs books!

    Verso London is sending books to Jungle Books (or Livres de la jungle in French), the makeshift library at the Calais migrant camp known as the Jungle. Mary Jones, who set up the library, wants to add more books in the native languages of the migrants, refugees and asylum seekers, and hopes that eventually, the camp inhabitants will run the library. Besides stocking around 200 books, the Guardian reports, “the library supports a school that offers classes to the refugees and asylum seekers that live in the camp.”

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  • The 2015 UK election: A Reading List

    No one can really predict an election, but I don't think anyone expected a majority Conservative government. As we look to a future of more food banks, increased poverty and homelessness, as well as soaring inequality, we present a reading list featuring leading voices dealing with the key issues in British politics today.

    Steve Bell on David Cameron's employment statistics, Guardian

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  • "Tightly coiled, unpredictable": Jeremy Hardings Border Vigils reviewed in the Guardian

    Writing in the Guardian, Andy Beckett nominates Jeremy Harding's Border Vigils as Book of the Week, describing its "ambitious... economical, sometimes elegant, usually understated prose". 

    Border Vigils is a powerful work of reportage, combining analysis of the politics of migration with first hand accounts of the people struggling to survive as they are faced with anti-immigration zealots.

    Beckett writes:
    In recent years, the economic slump has made immigration even more politically sensitive than during more confident eras. His underlying stance is liberal: broadly supportive of the migrants, highlighting the human cost when their desires are blocked. But as a longstanding writer on the ambiguous relationships between rich and poor countries, he is too streetwise to be pious. He is alert to the complexities of a world where refugees and economic migrants are not always easy to tell apart – even in the minds of the immigrants themselves – and where the same traffickers smuggle people, willing and not, and other illegal cargoes. "Nothing in the world of unauthorised migration," he writes early on, "is quite what it seems."

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