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Precarious Life: The Powers of Mourning and Violence

Responding to the US’s perpetual war, Butler explores how mourning could inspire solidarity.
In her most impassioned and personal book to date, Judith Butler responds in this profound appraisal of post-9/11 America to the current US policies to wage perpetual war, and calls for a deeper understanding of how mourning and violence might instead inspire solidarity and a quest for global justice.

Reviews

  • “It’s clear that its author is still interested in stirring up trouble — academic, political and otherwise.”
  • “A book that shines with the splendor of engaged thought.”
  • “Here is a unique voice of courage and conceptual ambition that addresses public life from the perspective of psychic reality, encouraging us to acknowledge the solidarity and the suffering through which we emerge as subjects of freedom.”
  • “Judith Butler is quite simply one of the most probing, challenging, and influential thinkers of our time.”

Blog

  • Judith Butler on gender and the trans experience

    Cristan Williams, a trans historian and journalist, interviewed Judith Butler about gender and the trans experience for The TransAdvocate. They discussed the problem with TERFs and the work of Sheila Jeffreys and Janice Raymond.

    Cristan Williams: 
    You spoke about the surgical intervention many trans people undergo as a “very brave transformation.” Can you talk about that?

    Judith Butler: It is always brave to insist on undergoing transformations that feel necessary and right even when there are so many obstructions to doing so, including people and institutions who seek to pathologize or criminalize such important acts of self-definition. I know that for some feels less brave than necessary, but we all have to defend those necessities  that allow us to live and breathe in the way that feels right to us.  Surgical intervention can be precisely what a trans person needs – it is also not always what a trans person needs.  Either way, one should be free to determine the course of one’s gendered life.


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  • Protesting in France could land you in prison

    The right to demonstrate is non-negotiable. But in towns and cities across France, society is being reordered in a way that criminalises social and political struggles.

    In Madrid, the opponents of the new Internal Security Act organized a demonstration of holograms in the Spanish Parliament.

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  • Women against inequality: A Verso reading list for International Women's Day



    "What is 'Women's Day'? Is it really necessary?" Alexandra Kollontai asked readers of the Russian journal Pravda a centenary ago. "On Women's Day," she wrote, "the organised demonstrate against their lack of rights."

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Other books by Judith Butler