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How Race Survived US History: From Settlement and Slavery to the Obama Phenomenon

An absorbing chronicle of the role of race in US history, by the foremost historian of race and labor.
In this absorbing chronicle of the role of race in US history, David R. Roediger explores how the idea of race was created and recreated from the 1600's to the present day. From the late seventeenth century—the era in which DuBois located the emergence of "whiteness"—through the American revolution and the emancipatory Civil War, to the civil rights movement and the emergence of the American empire, How Race Survived US History reveals how race did far more than persist as an exception in a progressive national history. Roediger examines how race intersected all that was dynamic and progressive in US history, from democracy and economic development to migration and globalization.

Exploring the evidence that the USA will become a majority "non-white" nation in the next fifty years, this masterful account shows how race remains at the heart of American life in the twenty-first century.

Reviews

  • “A pithy little book ... Remind[s] us that whiteness was built over centuries on a foundation of deceit and confusion and disguised political imperatives.”
  • “Starred Review. This rousing, thought-provoking history illuminates the enveloping 400-year-old history of race in America, and the issues [Roediger] raises are as relevant as ever.”
  • “Scholars and activists will be able to rely upon this book for much needed historical perspective. Based heavily on an acute reading and insightful interpretation of a vast array of the secondary literature, this book is a worthy addition to Roediger's formidable oeuvre.”
  • How Race Survived US History synthesizes a vast secondary literature ... into a simple yet elegant analysis.”

Blog

  • Steve McQueen plans film about Paul Robeson as follow-up to 12 Years a Slave

    Renowned artist and film-maker Steve McQueen has announced that the follow-up to his Oscar award-winning 12 Years a Slave will be a biopic of Paul Robeson. McQueen descibed the film as his dream project, stating that he originally wanted to produce a film about Robeson after Hunger, Mcqueen's debut film about Bobby Sands and the 1981 Irish hunger strike.

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  • 12 Years a Slave: Verso’s essential reading list on slavery and race relations



    This month sees the UK cinema release of Steve McQueen’s brilliant and brutal new film, 12 Years a Slave. McQueen has been vocal in condemning cinema’s wariness in confronting the subjects of slavery and race, and his film has galvanized a new interest in the unspeakably ugly period in American history. 

    Based on Solomon Northup’s 1853 documentary, 12 Years a Slave takes an unflinching look at the story of a free black man from New York who is abducted and sold into slavery.

    Verso has long held a commitment to telling similar stories, and we now present a selection of books as the essential starting point for those looking to learn more about the roots, events and legacies of slavery and racial tensions in America and the world.

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  • Racists and anti-racists by Etienne Balibar

    Xenophobia Blog Series. This is the second instalment of a series of pieces published on our blog by leading voices on the current and alarming force of Xenophobia - the fear of "strange and foreign" identities. 



    Racists and anti-racists by Etienne Balibar

    Where, when and how was the concept of racism formed? It seems to have its origins in a book that appeared in 1933-1934, in which Magnus Hirschfeld described the 'racial theory' underlying Hitler's conception of race war. So the word was born in Germany, by way of contact with its first 'object': the racism of the Nazi state elaborated in the name of the Aryan myth, principally directed against Jews, but also against other 'untermensch' peoples and populations.

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Other books by David R. Roediger