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The New Old World

A magisterial analysis of Europe's development since the end of the Cold War.
The New Old World looks at the history of the European Union, the core continental countries within it, and the issue of its further expansion into Asia. It opens with a consideration of the origins and outcomes of European integration since the Second World War, and how today's EU has been theorized across a range of contemporary disciplines. It then moves to more detailed accounts of political and cultural developments in the three principal states of the original Common Market—France, Germany and Italy. A third section explores the interrelated histories of Cyprus and Turkey that pose a leading geopolitical challenge to the Community. The book ends by tracing ideas of European unity from the Enlightenment to the present, and their bearing on the future of the Union. The New Old World offers a critical portrait of a continent now increasingly hailed as a moral and political example to the world at large.

Reviews

  • “He approaches the EU with the deepest skepticism, and finds much to justify the use of his blade.”
  • “Anderson is among the most insightful and policy-relevant analysts of modern Europe.”
  • “One of the best political, historical and literary essayists of the age.”
  • “As insightful, combative and invigorating as its illustrious predecessors.”
  • “This is a hugely ambitious and panoramic political book, of a sort rarely attempted in our era of quick leader biographies and reheated histories of the Second World War.”

Blog

  • A coup in Greece: four difficult questions from Franco 'Bifo' Berardi

    If one follows day by day the actions of the International Monetary Fund, the European Central Bank and the European Commission, it is easy to describe the scenario: the global financial system is organising a coup d'etat in Greece. And, in order to implement it, it is starving and humiliating millions of people, and pushing them towards a humanitarian disaster that we never expected to happen in Europe.

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  • Gerassimos Moschonas: Syriza and the EU after the first long battle—the balance sheet of the negotiations

    Gerassimos Moschonas, author of In the Name of Social Democracy, reflects on Syriza's strategy over the course of the negotiations, including what its achievements and failures reveal about possibilities for challenging European austerity. This piece was originally published in Telos22 May 2015.


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  • Durand, Kouvelakis and Keucheyan: "Make common cause with Greece"

    Syriza coming to power in Greece at the end of January has finally disproven the argument that it is possible to implement an alternative to neoliberalism within the framework of the European Union. The EU treaties are neoliberal, in their very DNA. Since the 1986 Single European Act, or even before then, we have seen constant proof of the EU’s neoliberal DNA, and even its hardening. Up till now, the untrammeled hegemony of neoliberalism could have been blamed on this or that government coming into office: in this view, the reason why austerity policies reigned across Europe was that a François Hollande, a Matteo Renzi or some other social-liberal lacked courage or betrayed their campaign commitments to reorient European policies.

    But with Syriza, that argument has collapsed. After all, Alexis Tsipras and Yanis Varoufakis have clearly been working with some determination to try and bring about change at the continental level; but they have done so in vain. Since 4 February the European Central Bank has cut off the main source of financing for the Greek banking system, while the payments from Europe itself were broken off in summer of 2014.  The noose is tightening, pushing the country toward a disorderly bankruptcy and chaos, unless of course it accepts the humiliating terms imposed by the EU.

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Other books by Perry Anderson