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Jacqueline Rose

Jacqueline Rose is internationally known for her writing on feminism, psychoanalysis, literature and the politics and ideology of Israel-Palestine. Her books include Sexuality in the Field of VisionThe Haunting of Sylvia PlathStates of FantasyThe Question of Zion, and most recently Women in Dark Times.

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  • Women Strike! A reading list for International Women's Day



    "What is 'Women's Day'? Is it really necessary?" Alexandra Kollontai asked readers of the Russian journal Pravda a centenary ago. "On Women's Day," she wrote, "the organised demonstrate against their lack of rights."

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  • The Israel-Palestine Conflict: A Reading List

    On Friday 23rd December the UN passed a resolution demanding a stop to Israeli settlement in the occupied territories as, in a shock move, the US refused to veto the resolution. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu exploded, calling it a 'declaration of war' (having recently been granted a $38 billion military aid package by the US), and Secretary of State John Kerry criticised Israel's approach to the peace process. But with Trump tweeting that Israel should 'stay strong' until his inauguration, progress still seems unlikely.

    Verso presents a list of books from Israeli, Palestinian, and anti-imperialist authors, to explain the conflict and provide some perspectives on the future. 

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  • Margaret Thatcher's funeral: an act of coercion


    By Jacqueline Rose

    Orginally published at Comment is Free

    She is not to be mourned. Which does not mean, either, that we should be dancing on her grave. Nor that grief is inappropriate for those who may have been close to her. Indeed, on such matters, no one has the right to pronounce. But she should not be mourned publicly, as if the British people were united in respect for one of the most divisive political figures in modern history.

    The funeral planned for Margaret Thatcher – a state funeral in all but name – is an act of coercion and a masquerade. It will be pretending, at a time when the social divisions of her legacy have never been more acute, that on this at least the British are at one. Worse, it will be proclaiming that image of false unity to the whole world. As if, for the space of a day, we are all meant to take time off from the cruel and increasing forms of inequality, the self-regarding ethos, the worship of money, that she left behind. If we should be grieving, it must surely be for what, partly but decisively because of her, we as a people have let ourselves become.

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