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Spaces of Global Capitalism: A Theory of Uneven Geographical Development

An essential introduction to the field of historical geography.

Fiscal crises have cascaded across much of the developing world with devastating results, from Mexico to Indonesia, Russia and Argentina. The extreme volatility in contemporary political economic fortunes seems to mock our best efforts to understand the forces that drive development in the world economy.

David Harvey is the single most important geographer writing today and a leading social theorist of our age, offering a comprehensive critique of contemporary capitalism. In this fascinating book, he shows the way forward for just such an understanding, enlarging upon the key themes in his recent work: the development of neoliberalism, the spread of inequalities across the globe, and 'space' as a key theoretical concept.

Both a major declaration of a new research programme and a concise introduction to David Harvey's central concerns, this book will be essential reading for scholars and students across the humanities and social sciences.

Reviews

  • “Harvey is a scholarly radical; his writing is free of journalistic clichés, full of facts and carefully thought-through ideas.”

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  • [VIDEO] David Harvey: Visualizing Capital




    In January, David Harvey spoke at the School of Geography and the Environment, Oxford to present "Visualizing Capital": what he "hopes is the end" of the project on Marx he began — inadvertantly — fifteen years ago. 

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  • Rebel Cities, Urban Resistance and Capitalism: a Conversation with David Harvey

    This transcript of Vincent Emanuele's interview with David Harvey appeared first in Counterpunch.


    March from El Alto to La Paz, June 2011.


    Emanuele:
    You begin your book Rebel Cities: From the Right to the City to the Urban Revolution, by describing your experience in Paris during the 1970s: “Tall building-giants, highways, soulless public housing and monopolized commodification on the streets threatening to engulf the old-Paris… Paris from the 1960s on was plainly in the midst of an existential crisis.” In 1967, Henry Lefebvre wrote his seminal essay “On the Right to the City.” Can you talk about this period and the impetus for writing Rebel Cities? 

    Harvey: Worldwide, the 1960s is often looked at, historically, as a period of urban crisis. In the United States, for example, the 1960s was a time when many central cities went up in flames. There were riots and near revolutions in cities like Los Angeles, Detroit, and of course after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King in 1968 — over 120 American cities were inflicted with minor and massive social unrest and rebellious action. I mention this in the United States, because what was in-effect happening was that the city was being modernized.

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  • Five Book Plan: Carceral Geography

    Brett Story's film The Prison in Twelve Landscapes depicts the variety of ways in which incarceration and criminal punishment shape the American landscape, both urban and rural — without ever showing a penetentiary. It begins its New York theatrical run on November 4th at Anthology Film Archives.

    Below, Story recommends five books on carceral geography: an approach to analyzing incarceration and policing in spatial terms, drawing from the discipline of human geography. 


    From The Prison in 12 Landscapes 

    1. Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis and Opposition in Globalizing California by Ruth Wilson Gilmore (University of California Press, 2007)

    Regardless of your interest in space or place, if you read only one book to help make sense of mass incarceration, it should be this one.

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Other books by David Harvey