Poorer_nations_cmyk-max_221 more images image

The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South

A Possible History of the Global South

In The Darker Nations, Vijay Prashad provided an intellectual history of the Third World and traced the rise and fall of the Non-Aligned Movement. With The Poorer Nations, Prashad takes up the story where he left off.

Since the ’70s, the countries of the Global South have struggled to build political movements. Prashad analyzes the failures of neoliberalism, as well as the rise of the BRICS countries, the World Social Forum, issue-based movements like Via Campesina, the Latin American revolutionary revival—in short, efforts to create alternatives to the neoliberal project advanced militarily by the US and its allies and economically by the IMF, the World Bank, the WTO, and other instruments of the powerful. Just as The Darker Nations asserted that the Third World was a project, not a place, The Poorer Nations sees the Global South as a term that properly refers not to geographical space but to a concatenation of protests against neoliberalism.

In his foreword to the book, former Secretary-General of the United Nations Boutros Boutros-Ghali writes that Prashad “has helped open the vista on complex events that preceded today’s global situation and standoff.” The Poorer Nations looks to the future while revising our sense of the past.

Reviews

  • “It is startling how insulated the West has remained from the thinking, achievements, and struggles of the great majority of the world’s people. This lucid and well-informed study reveals how much there is to learn from this rich and vibrant record.”
  • “At a time when the ideologues of the Washington Consensus appeal to former colonies to free themselves from history, Vijay Prashad recalls a past without which it is impossible to understand the present.”
  • “A unique, exceptional study that weaves together events, processes, and strands into a comprehensive overview of the struggle of developing countries to change the world economic order.”
  • “With eloquence, wit, and urgency, Prashad tells the real story of global restructuring, the dismantling of the Third World Project, the rise and demise of neoliberalism, and how the future of the planet is tied to the dreams of the dispossessed.”
  • “Vijay Prashad is our own Frantz Fanon. His writing of protest is always tinged with the beauty of hope.”
  • “Vijay Prashad has courageously and meticulously forged a fascinating study that challenges mainstream, Western narratives of world history. In this provocative and sweeping exploration, the injustices and subjugation of peoples in the global South are not only made visible but political.”
  • “Vijay Prashad is fast becoming the historian of the Global South. His newest book The Poorer Nations is as detailed and well-cited as anything by Noam Chomsky. Prashad turns the statistics and descriptions he writes into prose that is understandable and simmering with a justified rage.”
  • “An ambitious, complex, and lucid history of a political and economic project that emanated from the global South…The Poorer Nations distills a complex economic history into a lucid and engaging narrative… A historical materialist history of economic transformation that helps us understand the shift to neoliberal governance in our times.”

Blog

  • India: Liberal Democracy and the Extreme Right

    Aijaz Ahmad's essay on the history of the far right in India and its encroachment into the country's liberal institutions was included in the the Idea of India, Background Papers, EMS Smrithi Series compiled by M.N. Sudhakaran et al, Thrissur, June 2016 and previously published online by The Indian Cultural Forum.


    Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh meeting, 1939. via Wikimedia Commons.

    Indian liberalism makes a formidable claim: that the Republic is grounded in such a structurally elaborate and ideologically hegemonic liberal-democratic institutional framework that political forces of all hues are forced to consent to this framework, stake their claims and test out their fortunes within it, go in and out of the corridors of power through procedures of electoral democracy, and thereby further strengthen the liberal framework itself. It is further claimed that since all political forces, from the communist to the fascist, are compelled to accept the norms of universal franchise and multi-party elections, they are further compelled to move closer to the liberal centre as soon as they begin to participate in the exercise of governmental power. For the political centre of this power is itself circumscribed by equally powerful institutions of the civil bureaucracy, an independent judiciary, a freewheeling fourth estate, as well as a vibrant and highly articulate civil society. And, indeed, more than enough empirical evidence is available for one to construct a plausible narrative of post-Independence India on such premises. Its plausibility is what gives to the claim such persuasive power.

    Continue Reading

  • Verso's History Bookshelf




    A round-up of some of our history reading, from new to old.

    Continue Reading

  • A History of Struggle: Feminism and Nationalism in the 21st Century

    Dalia Gebrial responds to a history of women's movements to ask how a transnational feminist politics of solidarity can change and embolden our vision of the world. 

    The question of transnational solidarity has progressively faded away from the realm of feminist conversation. The idea of intersectionality – a powerful descriptor of how seemingly circumscribed systems of oppression operate through and alongside one other – has been reduced to representative diversity politics: a coalition of limited but energy-consuming practices of privilege-checking and callouts; a seemingly immovable emphasis on bodies and checklists as the prime marker of Good Praxis. Solidarity has been supplanted in favour of ‘allyship’ and ‘standing aside’. Creating spaces of self-determination has been neutralised into creating spaces of safety. Only the personal can be political.

    Rani of Jhansi Women's Regiment of the Indian National Army, training, early–mid 1940s. via End of Empire

    Continue Reading

Other books by Vijay Prashad