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The WikiLeaks Files: The World According to US Empire

The essays that make up The WikiLeaks Files shed critical light on a once secret history.” – Edward J. Snowden

Published in collaboration with WikiLeaks: What Cablegate tells us about US foreign policy.

WikiLeaks came to prominence in 2010 with the release of 251,287 top-secret State Department cables, which revealed to the world what the US government really thinks about national leaders, friendly dictators, and supposed allies. It brought to the surface the dark truths of crimes committed in our name: human rights violations, covert operations, and cover-ups.

The WikiLeaks Files presents expert analysis on the most important cables and outlines their historical importance. In a series of chapters dedicated to the various regions of the world, the book explores the machinations of the United States as it imposes its agenda on other nations: a new form of imperialism founded on varied tactics from torture to military action, to trade deals and “soft power,” in the perpetual pursuit of expanding influence. It illustrates the close relationship between government and big business in promoting US trade.

An introduction by Julian Assange—writing on the subject for the first time—exposes the ongoing debates about freedom of information, international surveillance, and justice.
With contributions by Dan Beeton, Phyllis Bennis, Michael Busch, Peter Certo, Conn Hallinan, Sarah Harrison, Richard Heydarian, Dahr Jamail, Jake Johnston, Alexander Main, Robert Naiman, Francis Njubi Nesbitt, Linda Pearson, Gareth Porter, Tim Shorrock, Russ Wellen, and Stephen Zunes

Reviews

  • “Long after the debate over the publication of these cables has been forgotten, the documents themselves will remain a valuable archive for scholars and students of US foreign policy. The essays that make up The WikiLeaks Files shed critical light on a once secret history.”
  • “Reveals a profound hatred of democracy on the part of our political leadership.”
  • “WikiLeaks is the absolute most important project on the globe.”
  • “From government to big business, if you have a dirty secret, WikiLeaks is your nightmare.”
  • “I’ve heard the impact of these releases on our foreign policy described as a meltdown, as a game-changer and so on ... Is this embarrassing? Yes. Is it awkward? Yes.”
  • “The guy ought to be ... and I’m not for the death penalty, so if I’m not for the death penalty, there’s only one way to do it: illegally shoot the son of a bitch.”
  • “A deep dive into what the cables reveal about America’s dealings with a variety of states. It will be left to other books to argue whether WikiLeaks is right or wrong in their mission and approach. This one gives solid context to the cables themselves, explaining what they mean to the wider world.”
  • “Takes on a huge amount of data and delivers a thorough introduction to the narratives of U.S. policy that the cables reveal [and]… makes the information in the cables accessible to a wide audience of readers who may not otherwise have the time or background knowledge to search through the data themselves.”
  • “Provides accessible insight into nearly every major news topic of today.”
  • “The whole weighty book is a missile aimed at breaking the plate glass of US diplomacy and revealing its motivations.”

Blog

  • A Hacktivist Reading List: Aaron Swartz's recommended reading

    Aaron Swartz (1986–2013) was an American computer programmer, a writer, a political organizer, and an Internet hacktivist, devoted to a free and open internet. He was involved in the development of RSS, Creative Commons, web.py, and Reddit. When he tried to 'liberate' data from an academic website, US authorities responded fiercely. He faced a fine of up to $1m and 35 years in jail. In 2013, he tragically took his own life. 

    The Boy Who Could Change the World is a newly-published collection of his writings; the life’s work of one of the most original minds of our time. In tribute to Swartz, this book is available to download for FREE—for one day only! We’ve also included other ebooks such as Inventing the Future, Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy, and The Wikileaks Files.

    Aaron Swartz read widely, posting annual lists of the books he enjoyed (and didn’t). Taken from The Boy Who Could Change the World, we bring you a hacktivist reading list – books that Swartz posted about from 2006-2011, presented here in his own words. 


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  • Psst! Downloading Isn't Stealing [for today]

    ATTENTION: The ebook giveaway is now over.

    Apologies for any difficulty you had downloading your ebooks. If you completed your order your ebook will be in your library and available for download at any time. If it's taking awhile to download, please wait a few hours and try again (please do not repeatedly attempt to download).

    For any outstanding issues please contact orders@versobooks.com.


    In January 2013, Aaron Swartz, under arrest and threatened with thirty-five years’ imprisonment, committed suicide. He was twenty-six. But in his short life he had changed the world: reshaping the Internet, questioning our assumptions about intellectual property, and creating some of the tools we use in our daily online lives. 

    In this recently published collection of his writingsThe Boy Who Could Change the WorldSwartz displays his passion for and in-depth knowledge of intellectual property, copyright, and the architecture of the Internet. The Boy Who Could Change the World contains the life’s work of one of the most original minds of our time, whose tragic suicide shook the world.

    In tribute to Aaron Swartzand to mark the publication of his writingswe've made the following ebooks available for FREE download for one day only! Unfortunately we don't have the North American rights to The Boy Who Could Change the World so this is book is NOT available for download in North America, but there are 5 other books to choose from!

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  • Berta Cáceres’ Unfinished Work

    At the present time several international organizations are pressuring us to build “megaprojects” on indigenous lands — refineries, tourist resorts, and hydroelectric dams — that threaten to displace our people.

    But we ask, “Who are the people that make these proposals? We are the people who live in those areas, and we should have a right to decide what kind of projects are built on our lands.” - Berta Cáceres, writing in 1999


    The assassination of Berta Cáceres in the pre-dawn hours of March 3 came as a shock to Honduras and to Latin America watchers around the world. Berta, a vibrant woman with a glowing smile, was still young  and seemed too full of life, too driven and too determined, to be cut down.

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