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Pocket Pantheon: Figures of Postwar Philosophy

A journey through twentieth-century philosophy with the titan of French thought

Pocket Pantheon is an invitation to engage with the greats of postwar Western thought, such as Lacan, Sartre and Foucault, in the company of one of today’s leading political and philosophical minds. Alain Badiou draws on his encounters with this pantheon—his teachers, opponents and allies—to offer unique insights into both the authors and their work. These studies form an accessible, authoritative distillation of continental theory and a capsule history of a period in Western thought.

Reviews

  • “Badiou’s sardonically compressed style is never less than pungent.”
  • “Badiou and his ‘pantheon’ remind us that a relevant as well as rigorous philosophy remains attainable, not to mention urgently needed.”

Blog

  • Badiou: Macron is the Name of a Crisis

    Macron is the name of a crisis of any politics that purports to "represent" political orientations in an electoral space. That clearly owes to the fact that the earthly disappearance of the communist hypothesis and its parties has little by little made the truth about parliamentarism apparent: namely, that ultimately it only "represents" small nuances in the dominant consensus around neoliberal capitalism — and not any alternative strategy. The far Right, in the brutal style of Donald Trump or the renovated Pétainism of Marine Le Pen, profits from this situation, since although it stands totally within that consensus it is alone in giving off the appearance of being on the outside.

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  • Alain Badiou, No Limit

    Philippe Douroux's report from Alain Badiou's final seminar was first published in Libération. Translated by David Broder. 



    His audience was there. 280 people in front of him, and thirty others in the hall before a screen, on the lookout for others leaving so that they too could enter the "cave" and face the master. An equal mix of men and women, the old and the young — mainly older, it should be said. None of them are dressed eccentrically, though there are sometimes some flashes of colour like orange or yellow trousers, or a bright yellow scarf with Indian motifs, doubtless a hangover of the 1970s. At the moment that everyone was about to go their separate ways, soon before midnight that evening, he even earned a standing ovation. That tells us how fervent his audience is.

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  • Althusser Today: Alain Badiou in conversation with Bruno Bosteels and Nick Nesbitt [VIDEO]


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Other books by Alain Badiou Translated by David Macey