9781784787691-max_221 more images image

If They Come in the Morning … : Voices of Resistance

With race and the police once more burning issues, this classic work from one of America’s giants of black radicalism has lost none of its prescience or power
One of America’s most historic political trials is undoubtedly that of Angela Davis. Opening with a letter from James Baldwin to Davis, and including contributions from numerous radicals such as Black Panthers George Jackson, Huey P. Newton, Bobby Seale and Erica Huggins, this book is not only an account of Davis’s incarceration and the struggles surrounding it, but also perhaps the most comprehensive and thorough analysis of the prison system of the United State.

Since the book was written, the carceral system in the US has seen unprecedented growth, with more of America’s black population behind bars than ever before. The scathing analysis of the role of prison and the policing of black populations offered by Davis and her comrades in this astonishing volume remains as pertinent today as the day it was first published.

Featuring contributions from George Jackson, Bettina Aptheker, Bobby Seale, James Baldwin, Ruchell Magee, Julian Bond, Huey P. Newton, Erika Huggins, Fleeta Drumgo, John Clutchette, and others.

Reviews

  • “Angela Davis taught me that I did not have to tolerate the racism I was suffering in the playground, she told me that I was not alone … it was in this book that I first came across the word ‘solidarity.’”
  • “Davis’s arguments for justice are formidable … The power of her historical insights and the sweetness of her dream cannot be denied.”

Blog

  • Five Book Plan: History of US Political Organizing

    For May Day, we present our latest Five Book Plan: L.A. Kauffman, author of Direct Actionselects five essential histories of political organizing in the United States.


    Black Panther women, West Oakland, 1970.

    Jo Ann Gibson Robinson (ed. David J. Garrow), The Montgomery Bus Boycott and the Women Who Started It: The Memoir of Jo Ann Gibson Robinson (University of Texas Press, 1987)

    Many people know that Rosa Parks was a trained and seasoned political activist before the famous day when she decided to stay in her bus seat. But few are aware of the large, well-organized network of black women in Montgomery that transformed her arrest into a historic campaign of mass noncompliance. This engaging memoir by Jo Ann Gibson Robinson, a key initiator of the Montgomery bus boycott, reveals the behind-the-scenes work of local organizers who had long been waiting and planning for the right opportunity to challenge racial segregation in their city when Parks was arrested. In an era when movements rely heavily on the internet to mobilize participation, there's much to learn from the extraordinary tale of how black women in Montgomery sprang into action the moment Parks was arrested, secretly distributing more than 50,000 leaflets throughout their community in fewer than 24 hours, and thus launching the boycott without tipping off the city's white leadership.

    Continue Reading

  • Political Prisoners, Prisons and Black Liberation: Angela Davis

    To mark May Day 2017, we bring you a selection of May Day Reading from the Verso Archive covering care work, sex work, black liberation & more; from Angela Davis, Gail Lewis, Melissa Gira Grant, Isabell Lorey, and Kristin Ross. Read them all here

    We also have 50% off all our May Day reading until May 2 at midnight: see the reading list here.

    The following essay is taken from If They Come in the Morning... Voices of Resistance, reissured as part of our Radical Thinkers series last year. With race and the police once more burning issues, this classic work from one of America’s giants of black radicalism has lost none of its prescience or power.


    Continue Reading

  • MAY DAY FLASH SALE: 50% OFF

    Click here to activate your discount.



    May 1st marks International Workers' Day, a festival of working-class self-organization stretching back over 130 years. It was originally inaugurated to commemorate the Haymarket Massacre of 1886 in Chicago, where a bomb thrown during a worker's strike kicked off a period of anti-labor hysteria.

    To mark this significant date, we have 50% off a selection of books looking at policing, riots, Rosa Luxemburg, neoliberalism, revolution and rebellion. Click here to activate your discount.

    Plus, see all our May Day Reading from the Verso Archive covering care work, sex work, black liberation & more; from Angela Davis, Gail Lewis, Melissa Gira Grant, Isabell Lorey, and Kristin Ross. Read all the essays here

    Continue Reading

Other books of interest